GW Faculty and Staff Submit Comments to HHS on Proposed Title X “Gag” Rule

A group of 17 members of the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health’s (GW Milken Institute SPH) faculty and staff submitted comments on July 26 in response to a recent rule proposed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The GW Milken Institute SPH group said they are “deeply concerned about any proposed changes to Title X policies that could adversely impact health center participation, given Title X’s major role in strengthening and enhancing health centers’ family planning performance.”

Making a Case for the Individual Mandate in Washington, D.C.

George Washington University Professor Leighton Ku is a member of the executive board of Washington, D.C.’s Health Benefit Exchange Authority.

Investigation into How State Laws Affect What Hospitals Allow Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants to Do

nurse practitioners and physician assistants in action

New research that seeks to understand how hospital policies dictate what nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) are allowed to do reveals that there is enormous variations across hospitals, and that, contrary to what might be expected, this variation is not associated with state scope of practice laws for either profession. 

Insights into How Supreme Court Nominee Kavanaugh May Approach the ACA

GW's Sara Rosenbaum and other experts believe that if he is elected to the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh’s decisions might please President Trump and his Republican colleagues in some instances and displease them in others.

Blog: The New District of Columbia Policy to Protect Insurance Coverage

The District of Columbia recently took an important step to protect health insurance coverage by creating a District-specific health insurance requirement.  This is in response to the unexpected termination of the federal health insurance requirement, which Congress narrowly passed last December.  The Affordable Care Act had required that federal taxpayers, except some with low incomes, to have health insurance or pay a federal income tax penalty.  The underlying logic was that this would incentivize more people to get coverage and prevent insurance premiums from rising for the great majori