Blog: Coverage of Thousands on the Line as Court of Appeals Reviews Kentucky’s Section 1115 Case

By Morgan Birdy and Teodor Handarov

Sixty-three public health scholars, including 10 deans of schools of public health, public policy, and public administration, recently filed two amicus curiae briefs urging the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to uphold two lower-court decisions blocking Medicaid work requirements in Kentucky and Arkansas and prevent up to 184,000 Medicaid beneficiaries in those states from losing healthcare coverage in the first year of the experiment alone.

Blog: Medicaid Work Requirement Experiments Could Prove Costly for Thousands of Patients and Staff

By Jessica Sharac, Peter Shin, and Sara Rosenbaum

Between 120,000 and 169,000 adult Medicaid health center patients across seven states could lose coverage for comprehensive and primary health care as a result of § 1115 work requirement programs approved by the current administration.

Blog: How Far Do Section 1115 Medicaid Experiments Designed to Restrict Eligibility and Enrollment Veer From the Norm? A 25-Year Perspective

By Alexander Somodevilla, Maria Velasquez, and Sara Rosenbaum

Introduction

Blog: Are 1115 Medicaid Work Requirement Demonstrations Experimental Initiatives or a Way to Side-Step Congress? (UPDATED)

By Sara Rosenbaum, Sara Rothenberg, Maria Velasquez, Leighton Ku, and Erin Brantley

Brief Calls on U.S. District Court to Strike Down New Hampshire’s Medicaid Work Experiment

The brief calls New Hampshire’s Medicaid work experiment “arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion and contrary to law.”