GW Researchers Awarded $1.5 Million by the Office of Minority Health to Study Hepatitis B-associated Liver Disease

An estimated 850,000 to 2.2 million people in the United States are living with Chronic Hepatitis B. Just one-third of people living with Chronic Hepatitis B are diagnosed. A research team from the George Washington University (GW) received a $1.5 million grant from the Office of Minority Health of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) to reduce and evaluate liver diseases attributable to Hepatitis B virus (HBV) through screening, vaccination and follow-up in the Washington, D.C./Baltimore metro area. The team is led by Y.

Blog: The Power of Convening and Early Lessons from Accountable Communities for Health

By Clese Erikson, Dora Hughes, Janet Heinrich, Helen Mittmann and Jeffrey Levi

 

Background

Blog: Coverage of Thousands on the Line as Court of Appeals Reviews Kentucky’s Section 1115 Case

By Morgan Birdy and Teodor Handarov

Sixty-three public health scholars, including 10 deans of schools of public health, public policy, and public administration, recently filed two amicus curiae briefs urging the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to uphold two lower-court decisions blocking Medicaid work requirements in Kentucky and Arkansas and prevent up to 184,000 Medicaid beneficiaries in those states from losing healthcare coverage in the first year of the experiment alone.

Blog: Medicaid Work Requirement Experiments Could Prove Costly for Thousands of Patients and Staff

By Jessica Sharac, Peter Shin, and Sara Rosenbaum

Between 120,000 and 169,000 adult Medicaid health center patients across seven states could lose coverage for comprehensive and primary health care as a result of § 1115 work requirement programs approved by the current administration.