How the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Intensified the Impact of the Public Charge Rule on Community Health Centers, their Patients, and their Communities

Community health centers operate in the poorest urban and rural communities that experience elevated health risks as well as a serious shortage of primary health care. Immigrants are disproportionately likely to be poor, and therefore experience a greater need for publicly supported health services. Community health centers serve large numbers of immigrants, not only because of their location but also because of the extent to which health centers have adapted their care and services to meet immigrants’ unique language, cultural, and health needs.

Missouri’s Historic Medicaid Expansion Will Produce Major Gains for that State’s Community Health Centers, their Patients and the Communities They Serve

By Sara Rosenbaum, Leighton Ku, Peter Shin, Jessica Sharac, Maria Velasquez

If the Affordable Care Act is Repealed, What Would Be the Impact on Community Health Centers and the Communities They Serve?

This fall, the United States Supreme Court will hear arguments in California et al. v Texas et al. The Court will decide whether the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) “individual mandate” remains constitutional even though Congress has zeroed out the tax penalty for not maintaining health insurance. The Court also will decide whether, should the individual mandate be deemed unconstitutional, Congress, in setting the penalty at zero, actually intended to repeal the entire law.

How Do The Coronavirus Laws Enacted By Congress to Date Address Access to Care for Medically Underserved Communities and Populations?

In recent days, multiple stories about COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on African Americans have emerged, and from these stories, it is becoming increasingly clear that the nation’s medically underserved communities and populations are at the highest risk for coronavirus and its worst effects.