How the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Intensified the Impact of the Public Charge Rule on Community Health Centers, their Patients, and their Communities

Community health centers operate in the poorest urban and rural communities that experience elevated health risks as well as a serious shortage of primary health care. Immigrants are disproportionately likely to be poor, and therefore experience a greater need for publicly supported health services. Community health centers serve large numbers of immigrants, not only because of their location but also because of the extent to which health centers have adapted their care and services to meet immigrants’ unique language, cultural, and health needs.

Blog: Medicaid Work Requirement Experiments Could Prove Costly for Thousands of Patients and Staff

By Jessica Sharac, Peter Shin, and Sara Rosenbaum

Between 120,000 and 169,000 adult Medicaid health center patients across seven states could lose coverage for comprehensive and primary health care as a result of § 1115 work requirement programs approved by the current administration.

Blog: Are 1115 Medicaid Work Requirement Demonstrations Experimental Initiatives or a Way to Side-Step Congress? (UPDATED)

By Sara Rosenbaum, Sara Rothenberg, Maria Velasquez, Leighton Ku, and Erin Brantley

New Report Estimates That Up to 43,000 in Montana Could Lose Health Coverage Due to Medicaid Work Requirements

Parents of young children, caregivers for the disabled, seasonal workers and other poor people in rural areas of Montana would be most affected.